Category Archives: Family

Christmas Wishes / Wesolych Swiat!

Christmas is fast approaching and it’s a special time in a family’s life. Our tight knit pack savours all preparations and traditions we carry with us from childhood or new traditions we started ourselves here in the UK.

IMG_20151209_125458It’s the season to give time and attention to each other, spend time crafting home decorations, putting up the Christmas tree – our case is hopeless as children insist on having a tree once we changed the calendar to December.

We are a mix of traditions and cultures: Polish, Trinidadian and British. We pick and choose the sweetest ones and make it ours. But the most important thing is that Christmas is about the excitement of having a couple of days together that are going to be slow and that we enjoy. Exploring presents amongst a sea of wrapping paper, lots of sofa hugs, indulging in the homemade treats we cooked together, taking a walk or simply snuggling under blankets to watch sun setting across the valley.IMG_20151224_102142

In early December, Big Son starts to pester me to make a list of food we’re going to cook for our big dinner on Christmas Eve – Wigilia. It’s a traditionally Polish night with nine, eleven, twelve or thirteen dishes for good luck. We’ve simplified it over the years, mastering the art of balance, to not overindulge our bodies with pierogis, mushroom soup or millets. In Poland just before the dinner, we traditionally share a blessed wafer bread and Christmas wishes. That’s the Polish part.

We start the dinner with British crackers and hats as we continue feasting on Polish delicacies of Wigilia. Pierogi is definitely the hit and the children every year are taking on a bigger part in preparing them with me. The fun, little spats, all the fuss of the day or two before Christmas.

The Trini part on Christmas Eve is the music, Parang, and the black cake which we order from a Tobago friend.

In my childhood in Poland, we used to get presents right after the Wigilia dinner. Here, our children wait for Santa to drop gifts at night, so on Christmas Day morning we can have the best kind of mess in our living room – full of wrapping paper, toy boxes, surprises, excitement and laughter.

The brunch on Christmas Day is the Trini style: ham with piccalilli and homemade hops rolls and leftovers from Wigilia, rounded up with the rich black cake.

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But the most important thing is that we spend that time together. Christmas is about giving each other love, time, attention and care. We love to catch up with the family, friends far away, watch the children playing with new toys, enjoy presents that were chosen thoughtfully with love or stretch the legs on a brisk walk.

It is quite tranquil and calm in England that day, while people are tucking in the Christmas Day lunch amongst their dear ones. I find it very special and soothing to have the paths, streets or parks to yourself. The true Christmas aura, even if we do not have snow here.

Merry Christmas and Wesolych Swiat!

Van Houten Cacao for sale!

Dutch Cocoa 100% available from Ftfoutlet on eBay

Van Houten Cocoa

I rediscovered an old classic cacao this year. Van Houten cacao was the one we used to make hot cocoas, desserts and cakes in my childhood. It was the 100% of pure goodness in times, when you can hardly find in shops a bar trying to mimic real chocolate – (my childhood was at the end of the communist era in Poland with shortages of nearly everything).

The Van Houten family traditionally made cocoa by a process they invented. Later, they invented the Dutching or Dutch method, where cocoa powder is treated with alkaline salts, making it darker and milder. This made it possible to create a chocolate or hot cocoa, by blending with milk or water easily.

It all makes Van Houten cacao perfect for patisseries, baking or making traditional cocoa drink. It is mild and creates a rich and velvety drink – our family’s favourite treat. I was fortunate to spot the old brand and now I’m sharing the good news with you.

I found it again in the French shop this year and we fell for its dark colour and richness. We decided to bring with us some of this goodness straight from France. We found Van Houten cacao to surpass in taste the chocolate or cacao available here in the UK.

Van Houten 100% Cocoa for Sale

Van Houten 100% Cocoa for Sale

It comes in boxes of 250g, no sugar added, with the traditional Van Houten logo. Just as I remembered it from my childhood. I’ve set up the FTF eBay shop and you can now buy it here.

Soundtrack to the drive…

One of the favourites tracks we listened to on the tour of Poland drive. Two Polish sisters, “Ballady i Romanse”. I translate:

What will remain of those years?
Maybe memories none.
Smoking in the staircase, showing off.
We sense something, fearful of something,
But generally we having a good time.
Who will swim across and who will not?
Who will drown?
Who will swim across and who will not?
Who will drown?
Sitting on the citadel’s wall, wine drunk and stoned.
Soothing nerves with laughter,
Worried with grandparents’ funeral.
But parents feel well.
Who will swim across and who will not?
Who will drown?
Who will swim across and who will not?
Who will drown?
We invent our deaths,
Now finding it tempting.
Who dies is who lose, who lose is who dies.
We sense something, fearful of something,
But generally we having a good time.
Who will swim across and who will not?
Who will drown?
Who will swim across and who will not?
Who will drown?
Sitting on the citadel’s wall, wine drunk and stoned.
Soothing nerves with laughter,
Worried with grandparents’ funeral.
But parents feel well.
Who will swim across and who will not?
Who will drown?
Who will swim across and who will not?
Who will drown?
Sitting on the citadel’s wall, wine drunk and stoned.
Soothing nerves with laughter,
Worried with grandparents’ funeral.
But parents feel well.
Who will swim across and who will not?
Who will drown?
Who will swim across and who will not?
Do you know?

Trip to Poland 2015

IMG_20151023_104231Thursday 22nd – left home at 3am. Eurotunnel went smoothly and we were in Calais by 7am. We had rainy skies all the way to Magdeburg. Not the best drive. We split the duty. Got there about 5pm. TomTom Go was very helpful and we had no troubles getting to the door of the Airbnb flat we rented.
We shopped for something to cook and came up with spetzel, beans in tomato sauce, corn and cheese. All ended up in one pot and finally five bellies.
IMG_5850Friday morning started out with cloudless skies. We had poached eggs and no-flour bread we got from the shop Thursday night.
We walked along the Elbe through the State Park and toured the neighbourhood.IMG_20151028_143936
Excellent weather for Autobahn driving and testing out the cruise control on the car. We made some stops along the way and got to Warsaw in the dark at 7pm.IMG_20151026_151117
Saturday we slept in as expected but not too long. We took the children to see Mrs FTF’s old apartment in Sadyba from 2002. It was a great memory seeing the place we spent a lot of time in when we first met. We shopped at a sports shop to pick up warm clothes for Mazury and soon after left the children in Warsaw and head for Lodz. IMG_20151029_151734Wojciech Waglewski and his sons Fisz and Emade were who we went to see at the 2015 Soundedit Festival. The concert was a showcase for JBL new speaker systems. The quality of the sound was excellent. I really enjoyed listening to a quality band with such clarity and power coming through. We walked along Piotrkowska Street. Dinner was at a Bulgarian restaurant, No 69. Great food. We walked the length of the street and back to the hotel.
IMG_20151027_095044Sunday we had breakfast at one of the new delis, Brednia. The croissants were not light French numbers but rather heavy “meal in one” jobbies that made us realise we were wrong to order individual meals on top of the two jelly filled ones we got with our coffees. We bought some Polish cakes at a nearby cukiernia Hortex for the children.IMG_20151031_103526 We chose to drive the old road back to Warsaw and got there in time to watch the Formula One race from Austin, Texas. Lewis won the race and sealed the championship.IMG_20151027_150600

Monday started out grey and cloudy in Warsaw. We got it all together and left there for Pasym. The sun came out as we crossed the Wisla and the drive was nothing short of amazing. The Autumn palette did its best to startle us with new vistas as we enjoyed the newly repaved roads. We had to turn back at one point in the forest because the road was being repaired and it meant an added 30mins to the trip. We got to the house at about 5:30pm. It is a modern house with lots of heaters scattered all over. No Internet! Detox for the next five nights. The town was very quiet and the moon was nearly full. The sight of the church steeple in moonlit silhouette was something to behold.
IMG_20151027_160701Tuesday began with a light haze over the village. We walked around to locate the shops and ended up in Centrum Delikatesy. Breakfasts are the best when you stay at AirBnb rentals. You have full control of your meals. And you get to try new things at a pace you are comfortable with.We drove to Rudziska Pasymskie where we were told of an old bobsled track that was built for Wehrmacht soldiers in WWII. The car almost got beached heading up the track so we parked and continued on foot.
IMG_5486The children climbed a hunter’s tower and for the next few days counted them as we passed many in the adjoining fields driving around the area. As we were returning to our car we saw a couple stuck on the hump of sand that almost got us. After some attempts to push the car the guy decided he’d run into the village to get help. Soon he was blasting up the hill in another car so it seems like they were local. They passed on the road to Szczytno and we got a resounding round of horns. Another quiet night with dinner put together with sausages and cheeses from two shops in Jedwabno.IMG_20151030_141104
Wednesday was exercise morning. Mrs FTF, Big Son and I did our 15mins HIT bodyweight. Mrs FTF then took the three children to the bakery to get new rye bread the owner promised her on Tuesday. Big breakfast and then we went in search of an airport. We drove to Olsztyn to find a tourist information centre. IMG_5450We were sent to Lotnisko Wilamowo in Ketrzyn. It was a longdrive but in the end it turned out to be Hitler’s secret airport used to get to his Prussian base and today a busier airport that we expected with 3/4 flights per day. We drove directly to Szczytno and found the Mazuriana to be just the place to have a family dinner. The children loved the fireplace and we got online with the free WiFi. We got back to the village and everyone retired quite early. The nights are solid with little noise. We moved all mattresses to one room and all cosied up on the floor.

French Children’s Menu

We visit France every year, either we are just driving through or holidaying there. We enjoy French food and we eat as locals as much as possible and absorb the way the French do it. Including the way families treat their mealtimes in restaurants.

I never was keen on the idea of children’s version of menus in restaurants – all have more or less the same stuff, boring and not healthy. You know what I mean: chicken nuggets, spaghetti, sausages, chips, french fries etc. The kind of food we hardly eat in our home (well most of it anyway), it implies as well that children can eat only limited type of foods and anything outside comfort zone will cause the riots and spoils the family meal.

IMG_20150625_201541I wonder why and when it crept in; is it the way our children eat at homes or schools rather? Why restaurants do not or stopped offering smaller plates of adult meals? Or are we lazy adults who don’t bother to offer kids wider array of foods that could be fun and tasty, because it is work?Children are often branded fussy eaters! Well, they could be, but they’ll warm up to things seeing you trying it out, cooking variety often and being adventurous while eating out.

I admire how French take their cuisine so seriously, the meal is sacred time and it should be real food. So school meals are not the same affair as the school lunches in the UK. And so we found out the French kids menu are not the same story as across the Canal La Manche.

Firstly, we in our family do not pay any attention to the children’s menu, even when insisted upon by waiters. We usually choose a couple of things to share with children and extra plate if needed, sometimes specifically asking for a smaller version of the chosen dish. In that way, the children eat the real things and develop their own particular preferences. Of course we do take into account what children like or do not like, but we do not shy away from challenging their taste buds. Our offsprings are not perfect, they might moan or be not so happy about the choice but in the end, they are usually happy to eat what’s on offer. And in the most cases, they end up liking it a lot.

On our last trip to France, our big son found us a lovely restaurant situated between fields, by a lake, in an old manor house. We sat out on the lovely terrace basking in the evening sun. Madam who runs the restaurant kindly offered us the children’s menu to consider, which in the first place we rejected.IMG_20150625_201625

Having gone through the menu and specials, I cast my eyes on the children’s menu  and I must admit I was pleasantly surprised. No chicken nuggets, but a real chicken fillet served with seasonal vegetables. It seemed like a good option for the youngest one. And no, no French fries on offer!

What arrived on the plate, was an even lovelier surprise. A proper size, real chicken meat adorned by vegetables mushed and shaped into a vegetable bed, with chunky asparagus, carrot, beetroot, mange tout, pepper and turnip playing the part of plants. It immediately held the children’s attention. All of it was freshly prepared and disappeared in their bellies quickly. I fell in love with the way the meal was served to cater for children’s natural need of play. They would dissemble the vegetable beds, asking what particular pieces were, before sliding them into their mouths.

That dinner was a pleasure and fun, very memorable. Again, French proved to me that family meals are serious matter, where the real food is a must and no one is excluded of a pleasure because of their age. That you cannot expect adults to develop the taste for a variety of dishes and foods if you do not expose their young taste buds to it. Bon appetite!

 

Przesilenie letnie w Carnac

Tegoroczne przesilenie letnie miało być dla nas wyjątkowe, bo mieliśmy je spędzić w Carnac, w Bretanii i przywitać lato które właśnie się rozpoczynało wśród kamiennych kręgów.IMG_20150621_061450

Niecierpliwie czekaliśmy na najkrótszą noc w roku, a rozpoczęliśmy ją oglądając wieczorne niebo nad morzem poprzez ogromne okno z naszego gite. Zatoka Morbihan jest piękna i ma wszystko, czego można sobie życzyć: ciche i wciąż dzikie plaże bez tłumów, skały tętniące morskim życiem – można zbierać ostrygi, małże i inne owoce morza dostępne w tutejszych brasseries. I do tego piękne sosny morskie dające wytchnienie od słońca w upalne dni.

Jeszcze w domu, zrodził się nam nieco naiwny pomysł, że możliwe będzie uczestniczyć w narodzinach słońca pomiędzy rzędami megalitycznych kamieni. Cóż, okazało się, że Carnac jest zamknięte dla publiczności tej nocy i do tego ogrodzone płotem biegnącym wzdłuż drogi. Nieco zawiedzeni, ale nie rozczarowani, zdecydowaliśmy się odwiedzić megality następnego dnia.IMG_20150621_061244

Zamiast tego, zdecydowaliśmy się przeżyć przesilenie letnie na plaży w naszej wsi. Spektakl Natury był przepięknym przeżyciem. Nasze dzieci, jak prawdziwi poszukiwacze przygód,bez kłopotu wyskoczyły z łóżek tuż po 5 rano i podreptały z nami na plaże. A tam zajęły się szukaniem muszli i krabów między skałami. Było już dość jasno i zaczęliśmy wypatrywać słońca. Pierwsze złote światło zaczęło kapać spomiędzy gałęzi sosen i tak rozpoczął się prawdziwy pokaz. Trochę tandetny i magiczny zarazem, ale byłam poruszona, ze mogłam przeżyć swoje pierwsze przesilenie letnie na plaży nad Atlantykiem.

Zdecydowaliśmy się zbadać megality w Carnac następnego dnia. Zabytki znajdują się na zachodnim brzegu zatoki Morbihan, zupełnie z dala od wybrzeża, i zajęło nam dobre 40 min żeby tam dojechać. Gdy zbliżaliśmy się do Maison des Megalithes z kierunku Auray, już ujrzeliśmy pierwsze rzędy kamieni. Szosa została wybudowana w latach 50-tych, w szczególności by poprawić dostęp do zabytków. Nie zdumiewa fakt, ze toczyła się wtedy bardzo gorąca dyskusja o tym jak trasa ma przebiegać, ale w końcu droga w kierunki do Le Menec, została ukończona.

IMG_20150623_211307W latach 90. wszystkie kamienne rzędy w Carnac zostały ogrodzone. Przede wszystkim dlatego aby chronić środowisko naturalne wokół kamieni i zapobiec erozji gleby niszczonej przez wielu turystów odwiedzających to miejsce. Jednocześnie wprowadzono również owce rasy Landes Bretagne by utrzymywać łąki w sposób naturalny.

Megality w Carnac podzielone są na piec sektorów, wliczając rzędy kamienne, mogiły lub dolmeny i menhiry, wysokie stojące kamienie. Szeregi kamienne w Le Menec są pierwszymi zaczynając od zachodu i obejmują jedenaście, ułożonych w kierunku północny wschód i południowy zachód, rzędów. Megalityczni budowniczy wykorzystywali ułożenie terenu i zawsze umieszczali menhiry w najwyższym punkcie rzędu, podczas gdy najmniejsze kamienie zostały ułożone w niższych partiach. Uważa się też, ze część menhirów ustawiono na długo przed przed kamiennymi szeregami Carnac.

Sektor w Kermario ma około 1 km długości, z dolmenem na końcu. Dolmeny były zbiorowymi mogiłami, z wąskim niskim wejściem prowadzącym w stronę komory grobowej, na górze zabezpieczone kurhanem. Kurhany te przez tysiąclecia uległy zniszczeniu. W połowie tego sektora, pozostałości młyna zostały przekształcone w punkt widokowy, aby z wysokości lepiej ocenić skalę i doskonałe wykonanie szeregów kamiennych.IMG_20150622_170958

Po drodze do kamiennych rzędów w Kerlescan, warto zatrzymać się przy megalitach Le Manio. To tutaj znajduje się Geant du Manio (Olbrzym Le Manio), najwyższy z menhirów w Carnac. Kerlescan jest najmniejszym sektorem megalitów, zorientowanym wschód – zachód, co wyróżnia go pośród innych rzędów. Zaskakująco, tylko niewielka część menhirów jest zakopana w ziemi i dość często w fundamentach pod nimi archeolodzy znajdują dowody na specjalne ceremonie przy erekcji kamieni.

Ostatnim sektorem kamieni jest Le Petit Menec, mocno uszkodzony gdyż część menhirów użyto jako materiały do budowy murów w okolicy.

Wiele z menhirów ma wyżłobienia, które są wynikiem erozji, a nie jak mogłoby się wydawać rytami  wykonanymi przez ludzi. Niektóre z kamieni maja nacięcia, ponieważ do niedawna Carnac był źródłem taniego budulca.

Kamienne rzędy w Carnac były budowane pomiędzy 5000 do 2500 roku p.e., według jednej z teorii, przez neolitycznych ludzi, którzy zdecydowali się zaadoptować nowy styl życia: rolnictwo. Według innych teorii, kręgi zostały wzniesione przez ostatnich zbieraczy-myśliwych. O tym jak ważne to miejsce było dla ludzi w przeszłości, świadczy liczba dolmenów i kurhanów na tym obszarze.

IMG_20150622_170119Przez wiele wieków, ludzie wierzyli ze kamienie w Carnac zostały pozostawione przez olbrzymów, jak Gargantua i dopiero w XVII wieku pierwsi naukowcy zaczęli się nimi interesować. Później, zainspirowani przez Williama Stukeley, ludzie przyjęli teorie, że jak Stonehenge megality w Carnac zbudowali Celtowie. Sądzono nawet, że były one miejscem ludzkich ofiar czy obserwatorium astronomicznym.

Dopiero w XIX wieku, zwrócono uwagę na szkody i zniszczenia megalitów, które zawsze były źródłem materiałów dla miejscowej ludności – do dziś można zobaczyć zabudowania gospodarcze wybudowane pośród rzędów kamieni  z użyciem megalitów. To spowodowało rozpoczęcie kampanii na rzecz wpisania kamiennych rzędów w Carnac na listę zabytków, ze względu na ich znaczenie historyczne i kulturowe. Francuski rząd rozpoczął wykup gruntów wokół megalitów, a od 1888 Carnac znalazł się na liście zabytków. Wtedy tez rozpoczęto pierwsze badania archeologiczne w Carnac. Wykopaliska trwały nawet w czasie II wojny światowej, kiedy to nazistowscy naukowcy próbowali znaleźć dowody na poparcie swojej teorii ze to ludzie “krwi nordyckiej” zbudowali Carnac.

Carnac jest bardzo popularne wśród turystów, by pospacerować pośród kamieni należy  zarezerwować przewodnika lub można zwiedzać szlakiem wzdłuż ogrodzenia – cala trasa wynosi około 4 km. Można również kontynuować zwiedzanie jadąc autem szosa wzdłuż ogrodzenia i zatrzymać się na parkingach przy każdym sektorze megalitów.IMG_20150622_164348

Szczerze mówiąc, byliśmy nieco rozczarowani ograniczonym dostępem do megalitów ale było to zrozumiałe. Mimo tego, można poczuć duchowe znaczenie i wyjątkowość tego miejsca. Jego skala, ogromny wpływ na krajobraz mówi o wysiłku, poświęceniu i pomysłowości ludzi, którzy zdecydowali się skonstruować szeregi kamienne na wrzosowisku, które również powstało w wyniku działalności człowieka. I długo po tym, jak ci ludzie odeszli, miejsce było wciąż wykorzystywane w pewnym stopniu nawet w średniowieczu. Nie dziwi wiec, ze kamienie w Carnac tak poruszają wyobraźnię człowieka, że są inspiracją dla artystów lub zwykłych ludzi, którzy są źródłem wielu legend tego miejsca.

Carnac Brittany

This year’s Summer Solstice was set to be special for us. Solstice in Carnac, Brittany, to feel the vibes of the past, feel the communion with Nature’s wonder of rebirth in Spring and the celebration of Summer as its start.IMG_20150621_061450

The shortest night of the year that we were awaiting impatiently, started with watching the evening sky over the sea through the huge, HD_screen_like window from our gite. The Bay of Morbihan is tranquil, all you could wish å from the seaside, secluded, quiet and still wild beaches with rocks sticking out from the seabed and marine pines giving some shade from bleaching sun.

We had some naive idea that it would be possible to experience the sun birth while standing between the rows of the ancient stones, exposing ourselves to the magic of this unique place. But, of course, it turned out that civilisation took the better of it and the site is closed off for the public by fencing. With sad hearts, we decided to visit the old chaps another day

IMG_20150621_061244Instead, we opted for Summer Solstice on the beach in our village. The Nature’s spectacle was very soul nourishing, blissfully beautiful for all of us. Our children, like real troopers were happy to get out of beds after 5 am to trot over to the beach with us. And they enjoyed themselves scouring for seashells and crabs between the rocks. When the first golden light peered from between the marine pines branches, the show started. As cheesy and as magical it was, I was thrilled to experience my first Summer Solstice on the beach.

We chose to explore the Carnac stones another day. The monuments are situated on the west side of Morbihan Bay, quite away from the seacoast, and it took us a good40mins drive to get there. As we approached Maison des Megalithes from Auray direction, we already met the first stone alignments. The road was built in the ‘50s specifically to improve access to the monuments. There was heated an argument about the route and its position, but eventually the Le Menec road towards the Le Menec, the most western alignment, was built.IMG_20150623_211307

In the ’90s all the Carnac alignments were fenced off to protect natural environment around the stones and prevent soil erosion due to high level of visitors. At the same time the sheep breed of Landes the Bretagne was introduced to maintain the site in ecological way.The Carnac site consists of five alignments, tombs or dolmens and menhirs, tall standing stones within alignments. Le Menec alignment is the first starting from the west, it comprises of eleven straight lines, arranged north east and south west. Megalithic builders used the terrain and always put the menhirs on the higher ground while the smallest stones were placed in lower grounds. It is believed some menhirs were erected well before the alignments themselves.

The Kermario alignment is about one km long with the Kermario dolmen at the end. Dolmens were a type of collective tombs, with a passage leading toward a burial chamber, covered by a barrow. In the middle of the Kermario, the remains of a mill were turn into a vantage point to view the monument from above.IMG_20150622_170958

On the way towards the Kerlescan alignment, there is smaller one, called Le Manio alignment. It is where the Geant du Manio is found, the tallest of menhirs in the Carnac stands. The Kerlescan alignment is the smallest at Carnac, oriented east – west, which is different to the other alignments. Surprisingly, only small part of the menhirs is buried in the ground and quite often in pits underneath them archeologist find evidence of some kind of foundation ceremonies.

The last alignment is Le Petit Menec, quite damaged as the some of menhirs were used as building materials for nearby walls.

Many of menhirs bear some grooves which are a result of erosion and not what one might think the evidence of some carving. Some of the stones even have some notches because until recently Carnac stones were a source of building material.

The Carnac alignments were build between 5000 and 2500BC, according to one theory, by neolithic people who were being transformed into farmers or according to the new one they were erected by the last hunter gatherers. Which ever you would be inclined to believe, it is difficult to really work out the purpose of them. How the site was important to the people in the past is obvious by the number of tombs in the area: dolmens and tumuli alike.

IMG_20150622_170119Through many centuries, Carnac stones were thought to be built by giants, like Gargantua, and it was not until the 17th century the first scholars took interest in them. Later, inspired by William Stukeley’s believe that Stonehenge was built by Celts, it was thought that Carnac alignments were too built by them and they were the site of human sacrifices or astronomical observatory.

It was later in the 19th century, that attention was drawn to the damage and destruction of the stone rows which were always a source of materials for locals – to this day you see farmhouses built within the stone rows. The preservation movement started with the aim to save the monuments as its historical and cultural importance was becoming obvious. The French government started to purchase the land around the megaliths and in 1888 the Carnac alignments were listed as historical monuments. It was then when the first archeological research started in Carnac. It continued even through WWII when Nazi scientists tried to back up their theories about people with “Nordic blood”.IMG_20150622_164348

Carnac remains very popular with visitors, you can only get inside the fenced off area with a booked guide or you can walk along the alignments, which is about 4 km route. Otherwise you can drive along the road with carparks available next to every alignment.

To be honest, we were a bit disappointed about restricted, understandably, access to the megaliths. Still while walking along them, you are getting the sense of scale of its undertaking and spirituality of the place. Its mighty presence in the landscape speaks of the enormous effort, dedication and ingenuity of people who decided to construct the alignments within the new environment, the moor and long after these people were gone the place was used to some extent even until Middle Ages. And no wonder the Carnac stones stirred human’s imagination, inspiring legends and artists alike.